job hopping

Job hopping traditionally was considered moving from one company to the next every one to two years, multiple times. The reasons for these moves was due to something other than a layoff or company closure. However, times have changed and it is unusual for individuals to stay in a position or at a company for over 6 years. Studies show that the average number of years a worker stays with an employer is 4.6 years, for younger employees (20 – 34) it is half that, at 2.3 years.

 

So, what does that mean for employers? Many employers and recruiters have changed their expectations, but still look for patterns in work histories. One short-term stay in a job is not cause for concern, and neither is a series of short-term jobs that were designed to be short-term, such as contracts or internships. However, when there is a pattern of quickly leaving jobs that were not designed to be short-term, it can become a cause for concern for an employer.


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Published on February 9th, 2017

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handling counteroffersWhen it comes to counteroffers from a candidate you have extended an offer to, my advice to employers is to proceed with caution. It is best to plan ahead for the possibility of your offer being countered so that you can respond rather quickly without stalling the process. Time lost at this stage of the game can definitely hurt the impression the potential new hire has of your company.

 

Candidates arrive at counteroffers a few different ways:


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Published on January 19th, 2017

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two-year schools virtual career fairThe agricultural industry continues to grow through diverse opportunities. There are more job opportunities in agriculture than there are graduates to fill them. Employers are increasingly looking for candidates with two-year degrees, technical diplomas, and certifications to fill these roles. “Two-year/technical graduates are very valuable to our organization,” shared Tara Tench, Assistant HR Manager, Southern States Cooperative, Inc. “The talent we are looking for are not always found in four-year graduates; many two-year schools offer the types of agricultural degrees that we are looking for along with the skill sets needed for many of our positions.”

 

Welders, electricians, mechanics, and truck drivers are a few typical roles that we often think as skilled trade opportunities. However, candidates with associates’ degrees or technical certifications from two-year schools are often a good fit for roles such as research assistant, sales, technician, executive assistant, operations and customer service to name just a few. In addition to drivers and mechanics, Southern States Cooperative has also filled positions in their retail stores with community college graduates, in roles that sell crop products, precision ag services, and products for livestock, like feed and animal health supplies.


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Published on September 7th, 2016

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appealing to the non-ag studentRecruiting for your openings can be difficult, especially when you are an ag company looking for students without agricultural backgrounds or degrees. When your entry-level accountant position is open, do you really need an employee that understands the industry, or just a really good accountant? Now finding recruiting strategies that do not cause you to have two separate recruitment strategies or spend twice as much money on your recruitment needs can be a little difficult. However, you will be amazed at how AgCareers.com can be a resource for non-ag students! In 2015, 35% of our applicants held a non-ag degree and 41% of applicants were currently in a non-ag related occupation.

 

A few ways to strategically recruit non-ag students may be:

 

1. Look into attending non-ag career fairs or entire college career fairs. This allows you to interact personally with those students. A new option that we are launching this fall is the AgCareers.com Virtual Career fair. With over 35% of our job seeker community not currently in or with a background in agriculture you can interact with them from your desk. No travel fees, or wasting excessive amounts of time makes a virtual career fair the perfect place to recruit!


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Published on July 26th, 2016

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hiring seasonal or temporary workersAgriculture has a higher need than any other industry for seasonal and temporary workers. These roles tend to last for 4-6 months and can be incredibly difficult to fill –usually the openings are for general laborers and are on-farm with long hours during the growing season.

 

Let’s take a look at some of the key factors to keep in mind when hiring seasonal or temporary staff.

 

What to Consider when Hiring Seasonal or Temporary Workers

 

Onboarding

You may naturally assume that this new hire won’t be around for long so you don’t have to spend too much time on training and safety, but the exact opposite is true. Even if they have prior farm experience, the hire doesn’t know you, your operation, your machinery, or the unique hazards that as an owner you probably don’t even think about anymore. Pair that with a new hire that is eager to please and just get the job done, and it could be a recipe for an on-farm accident. Don’t assume that they know everything. Take one day to do a walk around. Talk about confined space, talk about the chemicals you use on your operation, and even which animals may act unexpectedly or which loader has a hydraulic leak to be careful when the bucket is lifted. This kind of walk around also creates the right open dialogue that will continue through this employees’ term. No question is silly and you would rather be approachable and informative than have an accident on your farm.

 


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Published on April 8th, 2016

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relocation among new graduates in agricultureOnce you have hired an employee and relocation will be required, there are many actions an employer can take to make the transition go smoothly for them. Employees who are moving have a big challenge ahead of them, and much of what goes on in their lives in the weeks or months to come has little to do with their new job. Moving is mentally, emotionally, and physically challenging! The way you support the relocation is an opportunity to assure the new hire that they made the right decision to join your team, makes them feel valued, and commences a smooth onboarding process. Here are some things to consider:

 

Approach the Idea with Enthusiasm

 

Help the new employee see the pros of the relocation over the cons. Be enthusiastic in all your communications regarding the new hire coming on board. Help them see the new opportunity as professional advancement and the overall long-term value of the relocation.


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Published on November 16th, 2015

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Study GroupMore than 1 in 3 workers in America are millennials, which is anyone between the age of 18 and 34 as of 2015. Since the beginning of my career I have had to overcome many stereotypical attributes associated with me because of my age/generation. I’d like to think that I’m not your typical millennial but after working on the top 10 positive attributes they bring, I’m completely okay with that label! I reached out to my social network (imagine that), tweeted, posted on Linkedin and Facebook and asked my professional and personal network what they thought were positive attributes of milleniials. Some I wouldn’t have thought because I feel like it comes naturally but maybe that is what makes us a benefit in some office environments.

 

1. Networking – They know how to build and leverage their networks online, on the plane and at Thirsty Thursday happy hour!

 

2. Communication – They know how to utilize multiple communication channels to keep their office in tune of their status and have a great understanding of appropriateness/professionalism.

 

3. Confidence – whether it is in a meeting, at a reception, or turning in a project, millennials are confident in their abilities and themselves.


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Published on September 24th, 2015

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UnknownOne of our strategies for 2015 at AgCareers.com included the addition of a couple of “blogs” to our social media arsenal. Viola, now we have Talent Harvest, our blog for HR Professionals, and Career Cultivation for all levels of talent. While we have been talking about it for a couple of years, I must admit I really did not understand exactly what a blog was until early this year. While doing a little homework to educate myself, I fund the following definition: “Blogs serve as tools to deliver timely information with a personal touch in an informal or conversational style.”

 

When you conduct searches on the Internet for information, you will likely land on something interesting and not even realize that you have just read a blog. The cool thing about blogs is that you can subscribe (via email) to select blogs of interest and you will receive routine update notifications. There are literally thousands of blogs out there! Just Google some of the following: wine blogs, pet blogs, food blogs, vacation blogs, etc. and you will find all sorts. For our Human Resource and Recruiting professional friends, I would like to share a few blogs that I subscribe to and enjoy reading:


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Published on September 2nd, 2015

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Hand on KeyboardWe have recently expanded our sales team here at AgCareers.com, which meant taking a fresh look at our Account Manager job description.  We realized the old description did not at all reflect our culture and the passion our team members have……we needed to make time for a revamp, even if it meant delaying the hiring process.  This before and after displays where the message becomes more conversational and targeted to engage like-minded talent.

 

I can say from first-hand experience with the applicants, that the candidate pool was better with the revamped position description.  We were attracting more people with passion that were interested in a career vs. just “a job”.  People seemed to feel more connected to what we do.


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Published on August 27th, 2015

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Screen Shot 2015-07-14 at 11.24.52 AM copy copyby Victoria Price, 2015 AgCareers.com Marketing Intern

 

The hiring process is always an exciting and difficult time for both employers and job seekers. So employers, when you find the right employee, you might think you’re home-free, but then you find out they’re wanted by other companies. How do you persuade a candidate with multiple job offers to join your team?

 

There are many tactics that can be utilized to persuade a candidate to join your team. Promoting your company is the first step to any tactic to take to make sure your company name is known and recognized among job seekers. The AgCareers.com Agribusiness HR Review documents that the five  most effective means of reaching prospective applicants is through corporate websites, social media sites, association or trade journals and newsletters, and industry-specific job boards. Drew Ratterman, Commercial Workforce Leader for Dow AgroSciences, said that in addition to promoting their own job board and through AgCareers.com, they have an employee referral program to “bring similar talent to the table” when hiring.


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Published on July 14th, 2015

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