lunch interviewA lunch interview is a common portion of the interview process. Often, a lunch interview is an opportunity to have a more casual conversation with a candidate over a meal while still getting to know them as a person and as a professional. Many employers even opt to do to the entire interview over lunch instead of in an office setting. Like all interviewing methods, a lunch interview has unique advantages. Check out this list of reasons to do a lunch interview.

 

It presents an opportunity to meet with a candidate on a more personal level.

 

Formal in-office interviews are typically more tense situations for candidates. A lunch interview, while it should still be taken as a formal interview, also invites the candidate to relax a bit more and be themselves. While they should still show a certain amount of nervousness, as it shows they are taking this seriously, it allows for more openness and casual conversation over a meal. Once the questions do start rolling, the candidate has been given an opportunity to ease into getting to know the interviewers as well. This type of interview also serves as a great indicator of emotional intelligence. How easily is conversation flowing? Do you feel like connections are being made? Are they able to laugh a little?


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Published on February 22nd, 2018

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Kacey ToewsAgCareers.com is privileged and pleased to welcome our newest member to our team Kacey Toews! Kacey joins us from a home office in rural Powhattan, Kansas as Talent Solutions Specialist.

 

What do you do on a day-to-day basis in your role with AgCareers.com?

 

I handle all of the new accounts as well as my established accounts and assist them in utilizing our products.

 

What do you enjoy about working with AgCareers.com?
 
I love that every day is something different and being able to build relationships with the different agriculture companies every day and see what I can do to assist them in their hiring needs. I also love working with our team, everyone is very helpful and encouraging.

 

What advice would you give to employers using AgCareers.com for the first time?
 
Take time to familiarize yourself with the site and take advantage of the resume database, it is a great tool!


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Published on February 13th, 2018

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virtual meeting etiquetteIf you rev up GoToMeeting on a regular basis or communicate with coworkers and clients via Skype, this blog post may be for you. A virtual meeting is no less formal than a face-to-face meeting and should be treated as such. Here are some tips to consider next time you turn on the webcam at work.

 

10 Rules for Proper Virtual Meeting Etiquette

 

Check your background. If you’re a professional, you probably don’t need to be told to remove anything offensive from your background, but anything distracting goes as well. Do you have something flashing in the background or people walking around? Try to angle your webcam away from whatever might be moving in the background so that you are shown against as clear and as tidy a background as possible.
 
Know your technology. We often tell candidates participating in virtual interviews to check their webcam and microphone technology as well as their Internet connection. It doesn’t hurt to do the same for a virtual meeting, especially if you rarely conduct them.


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Published on January 30th, 2018

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unplugging from work over the holidaysWriting this blog post is on my list of things to get done today, as I leave the office for a holiday break, so I don’t have to work during my time off. However, being the AgCareers.com employee that I am (and I know many of my coworkers would agree with me), I intend to bring my laptop home over my break to tend to some small duties while absent from the office. I wouldn’t say that I struggle unplugging from work, but at times, like during my two-week vacation this summer, I wonder why I can never just totally leave work at the office.

 

Google unplugging from work and you’re sure to find many research-backed articles explaining the benefits of taking time away from your computer such as an increase in productivity and creativity when you return. It’s true; I often feel recharged and ready to tackle challenges after I’ve stepped away from my desk for a time. Soaking up time with your families and friends, pursuing outside hobbies and interests, and simply relaxing instead of worrying about what emails may be coming in is not only healthy for us but also for those around us and our relationships. It all sounds good, right? And deep down, we know we all want that feeling of revitalization and peace of mind to just let go of work.

 

If only it were that simple, you may be thinking. Well, it can be. Here are some tips for unplugging from work over the holidays or a vacation:


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Published on December 20th, 2017

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Office Christmas PartiesAhhhh ’tis the season for office Christmas parties…necessary in a way but oh so difficult to pull off appropriately while still having fun and showing appreciation. Office Christmas parties are meant to give your guests (and perhaps their significant others) a nice evening out to show your appreciation for all their hard work this year. And let’s be honest: it’s kind of tacky if you don’t do something to show extra appreciation to your employees. Here’s how to throw a nice office Christmas party for your employees without getting out of hand or being boring.

 

What To Do: This is the trickiest task: doing something fun but simple. First, try taking the party offsite. It will be more fun for your employees to get out of the atmosphere of the office and experience something more interesting. A dinner is a simple, go-to choice for office Christmas parties, but shake up the mold by going for a theatrical performance or a sports event afterward. To make the event more formal, consider a progression dinner at various fine dining establishments throughout your city. Start somewhere for hors d’oeuvres and light drinks followed by a different main dining location and concluding with a dessert location. If you’re interested in holding the event to just one location, choose a restaurant or banquet setting (such as a hotel) with plenty of room to socialize and say a few words of thanks.


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Published on December 7th, 2017

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agricultural careersAs a high school freshman attending my first FFA meeting, I remember glancing toward a classmate I knew lived in town and likely knew nothing about agriculture. I thought, I wonder what she’s doing here. Is she chasing a farm boy? She was a successful and popular student that excelled in all sports; what interest did she have in agriculture? To my surprise, that classmate of mine ended up teaming up with me on soil judging and multiple speaking contests as well as studying both plant science and agribusiness in agricultural education courses alongside me. While she became quite active in the FFA chapter and agricultural classes in high school, her future endeavors eventually led her away from any prospect of an agricultural career.

 

As I sat down to write this blog meant to discuss AgCareers.com’s new Careers in Agriculture E-Book, I couldn’t help but think about my initial judgment of her, thinking she couldn’t possibly have any interest in agriculture or agricultural careers. It’s how I looked at most of my classmates and peers in high school as well as college that weren’t from a farming background, especially at the small liberal arts college I went on to attend (perhaps someone could have labeled me similarly to how I labeled my classmate, after all). But what was stopping me from discussing with them the opportunity of pursuing agricultural careers?


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Published on November 29th, 2017

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job posting wording that will scare youOh the horror! Of the cliché job posting wording! Seriously, how many job postings have you read that DIDN’T begin with “We’re looking for a self-starter to join our team!”? Working for an outstanding site that offers a job board among our many talent solutions services, I tend to feel like just about every one begins that way. It always strikes me when a job posting uses ridiculous language and overused buzzwords to try to attract applicants when really, it’s doing the exact opposite. So grab a thesaurus or read on for new and improved ways to update your job posting wording:

 

Self-Starter: Let’s get this one out of the way first. I literally feel like I see this buzzword on every other posting I view and it’s getting to be annoying. Pretty sure everyone wants a self-starter, otherwise it would imply that they need a babysitter. And like multitasking, which we’ll get to in a minute, everyone is going to say, “Hey, I’m a self-starter. I should apply to this job!” This is because it’s not a skill or a trait, it’s just a fluffy word that doesn’t have much meaning. Flip the switch here: if you see “self-starter” on a resume, does it really get you fired up about a candidate?

 

Job Posting Wording to Use Instead: Independent, Outgoing, Gear-Shifter, Reliable, Motivated


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Published on October 31st, 2017

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Kristi Sproul Education & Marketing Specialist AgCareers.comKristi Sproul, AgCareers.com’s Education and Marketing Specialist, recently joined AgCareers.com this summer. She works from a home office in Western Oklahoma.
 
What do you do on a day-to-day basis in your role with AgCareers.com?
 
I really get to do a wide variety of projects which is exciting and keeps my days interesting. Within a day I may work with University Partners in promoting their online master’s programs, write content for blogs or newsletters, help promote AgCareers.com resources to targeted audiences or assist in building the framework for market research projects.

 

What do you enjoy about working with AgCareers.com?
 
My coworkers’ level of talent really makes the job enjoyable. I am fortunate to work with a team that is goal-oriented, solution-focused, and eager to deliver valuable resources to job seekers and employers.


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Published on October 13th, 2017

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military talentIt’s no secret that the relationship between agricultural employers and military professionals and veterans could improve. AgCareers.com is continually working toward that with our Ag Warriors program and committed Ag Warrior employers. We also look forward to holding our first Military Virtual Career Fair on November 9 and invite all employers to attend to converse with and recruit military veterans and professionals. In the meantime, a look at AgCareers.com’s 2016 survey “Veterans and Military Professionals in the Agricultural Workforce” reveals interesting findings that agricultural employers may take into consideration to attract military talent.

 

Attracting Military Talent in Agriculture

 

  1. 1.Understand a veteran’s capabilities. 70% of veterans surveyed wished agricultural employers better understood a veteran’s capabilities when hiring and working with them. Military professionals and veterans come ready to work with characteristics including leadership, accountability, and discipline (top three responses according to veterans). Digging deep into a veteran’s past experiences can be the key to a great hire and a successful relationship with future military candidates.
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Published on October 3rd, 2017

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Meet Chris McLoughlinChris McLoughlin recently joined AgCareers.com as an Inside Sales Representative for Western Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. He works from the Guelph, Ontario office.

 

What do you do on a day-to-day basis in your role with AgCareers.com?

 

I reach out to current and perspective customers by both phone and email to make sure that they understand the benefits and value they get when posting jobs with us and I drink a lot of coffee.

 

What do you enjoy about working with AgCareers.com?

 

The people I work with are amazing and make coming into work each day a breeze. Being a small part of helping people reach their potential in their chosen careers is a great feeling.

 

What advice would you give to employers using AgCareers.com for the first time?

 

Make sure that your ad has enough information about what your company does, what the role entails and what you are offering your potential employee. The more information you can give a job seeker about what the job involves and what is expected the more informed applicants you will get.

 


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Published on September 19th, 2017

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