How Job Interviews are Like Blind Dates

By   |   May 17th, 2018   |   0 Comments

job interviews are like blind datesOhhhhh, the nervousness, unpredictability, and awkwardness of blind dates…. or job interviews! It doesn’t take much effort to illustrate the similarities between the two, even in dictionary definitions:
 
• Blind Date: a social engagement or date with a person one has not previously met.
• Interview: a formal consultation usually to evaluate qualifications.
 
Fact #1: In job interviews, you’re typically socializing with someone who you haven’t met before.
 
Fact #2: In blind dates, you’re evaluating your date’s qualifications and “fit.”

 
You know a few details about your blind date from their online dating profile, or from the friend/relative that set you up. You know a little information about your potential employer, based on their career site, job postings, and referrals. They know a little about you from your resume. But, in all these circumstances, we tend to know only what they really want us to know, which is the good stuff – where do we excel, what are strengths, best qualities, or positive reviews. Also, the oversell and “fluff” that resumes, job postings, and dating profiles are notorious for!
 
So, an interview, much like a blind date, is also about finding out what’s too good to be true. Good news is, this works both ways! Not only are you being evaluated, but you are evaluating too – appraising your date or your potential employer.
 
1. On-time?
2. First impressions- grooming, dress, smile, handshake
3. Composed and confident?
4. Can you establish rapport and make connections?
5. Do their qualifications/claims seem to match?
 
Then at the end, it’s the feared next steps; do you get an invitation for a second interview or invite for another date? Maybe after hearing more details about the role, or meeting your potential employer/date, it just doesn’t seem like a right fit for you. In this case, advising them as quickly and politely as possible is recommended.
 
If you’re the one waiting to hear back, don’t be shy about a quick follow-up email, text, or call if it’s been a week or two. There may have been unforeseen circumstances contributing to the delay in communication. However, be aware of repeated follow-ups that could seem creepy to your date or potential employer!
 
To prep for your interview (or blind date) check out this article on making a great first impression.




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