updating your resume

By Danielle Tucker, 2017 AgCareers.com Marketing Intern

 

How long has it been since you’ve used your resume? It could be a few weeks, it could be a few years and a lot has happened in your life between then and now. If you haven’t been consistently updating your resume, you might want to think about a few things before applying to the new job.

 

1. Contact information

 
This might be obvious, but there’s a good chance your email has changed and maybe your address as well, especially if you are in college! Make sure that your contact information is updated and you are reachable by the information you give. Be sure to include an appropriate email that you check often. Employers don’t want to see an email that says, “cutestuff@x.com”.


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Published on June 29th, 2017

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Better hope you don’t get called for an interview – that is, if you lie on your application!  Lying could include listing education, skills, or experience that you don’t have, filling in gaps in your work history with “fake” jobs, or exaggerating your credentials.

 

Dishonesty in the application process doesn’t just impact you and the potential employer.  Not only are you lying, but your references are forced into a rather sticky situation if they are put on the spot and become part of the deception.


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Published on May 23rd, 2017

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land a job right out of collegeDon’t hate me–I know, this blog post may not be super timely, as most of the college students I’m speaking to at this moment have just recently become graduates. But there’s still time to say you got a job right out of college if you haven’t already! Here are a few tips on how to land a job right out of college:

 

Not Too Picky, Now: I have always felt that you have a right to be picky with what you choose to pursue in terms of a career. It’s something you could be doing for a long time, so you should pick something that you want to do. But let’s get down to earth: if it’s your first job, it’s okay to go with something that isn’t your dream job right off the bat. Your dream job might not be available right now, so go for something that you can see improving you in the meantime.

 

Get Professional: Time to shape up social media profiles and get a professional email address. No more kittycat123@hotmail.com or alcohol in your in profile picture.


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Published on May 16th, 2017

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including association experience on your resumeIf you are active in agricultural programs and education while attending high school or college, you likely have some very valuable experience and honors under your belt! But is it okay to put that on a resume to share with employers? In most cases, most certainly. Agricultural employers will want to know if you have relevant association experience. It also may serve as a source of connection if your potential employer was involved in these programs as well. Learn how and when to properly include association experience on your resume.

 

How & When to Share Association Experience on Your Resume

 

Association experience is helpful to include on your resume when you have been actively involved in an organization and have achieved multiple honors or gained highly valuable and exemplary experience relevant to the job you are applying for. If you have served as a State FFA Vice President, include that on your resume. If you earned the American FFA degree, include that on your resume. If you have taken part in an AFA Leader Institute, include that on your resume.

 


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Published on May 3rd, 2017

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overqualifiedWhen applying for any jobs, the number one thing to keep in mind is selling to the employer’s need. This is also the case when applying for a job when overqualified. There are many reasons why a person may be applying for jobs when they are overqualified, including:

 

– Changing careers

– After a lay-off

– After completing a contract position

– Relocation

 

In these situations, jobseekers may be fearful that they are taking a step down in their career path, earning less money, and could be bored with reduced responsibilities. While these are genuine concerns, there are some positive aspects to applying for positions when overqualified:


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Published on April 7th, 2017

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UNDERQUALIFIEDShould you apply anyway? This is a question many job seekers face, but not one that you should stress over. Applying when you’re underqualified is totally acceptable as long as you have read the job description and know that this is something that you have a chance at.

 

Ask yourself these questions first: How underqualified are you? Can you do the job? There are times when you certainly won’t, and you must be honest with yourself from reading the job description. If the job requires a doctorate degree and you only have a Bachelor’s, you’ll probably just be wasting your and the company’s time.

 

Other criteria might include years of experience and specific skill sets. This is where things are a bit more flexible. If you meet some but not all of the requirements and you read the job description and you know you can do the job, then go for it! But you’ll need to do a few extra steps to ensure that you indeed leave an impression even if underqualified:


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Published on April 5th, 2017

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golden rules of resume writingEvaluations of resume writing can be very subjective, influenced by personal taste and feelings. Potential employers may have an opinion on your font style, design, or whether or not you should use a summary or personal statement, to name just a few. But even though your resume is subject to this type of evaluation, it is important to not dismiss objective, measurable facts from your resume.

 

There are some key resume writing tips that hiring managers can agree on:

 

The Golden Rules of Resume Writing

 

• Spell check, read and re-read. Have a friend check your resume. Misspellings and grammatical errors show a lack of attention to detail. This may seem obvious, but it happens frequently! These mistakes can often be fatal to your job search prospects and automatically send your resume to the “no” pile.


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Published on February 28th, 2017

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secret job searchIt’s incredibly important to maintain discretion during your job search. Unless there has been a mutually agreeable conversation between yourself and your manager regarding your wishes to move on, it’s in your best interest to keep your intentions secret until you’re at the point of providing references. Many employers see departing employees to have lost loyalty and no longer have their company’s best interests in mind. Employers often consider currently employed candidates to be more valuable than those who are unemployed for unknown reasons. But how do you go about a secret job search when you have an existing full-time job?


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Published on February 16th, 2017

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average peopleAverage. Mediocre. Ordinary. Do you describe yourself with any of these terms, or has anyone else? Never have you heard someone utter “overachiever” in relation to you?

 

There is still a valuable place for you in the work world even if you weren’t class president, didn’t lead a committee to record fundraising, haven’t worked in management at a global corporation, or weren’t a star athlete or had the lead role in a play.


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Published on January 17th, 2017

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managing your online reputationDoes it really matter what you tweet, photos you are tagged in on Facebook, or comments you make online? Career-wise, yes! Employers are checking out your “digital footprint” or online presence, many before making a hiring decision.

 film A Cure for Wellness 2017 trailer

Employers are judging you based on your digital footprint. Recruiters will look at your online presence and this can impact their hiring decisions. The recent Jobvite Recruiter Nation Report 2016 found that recruiters find LinkedIn the most effective when vetting candidates during the hiring process, followed by Facebook and Twitter.

 film A Cure for Wellness 2017 trailer

Looking specifically at agriculture, employers report high usage of social media to support their recruitment efforts; 72% of U.S. agribusinesses said they currently use social networks in recruiting, with another 14% indicating they plan to begin using them (2016-2017 U.S. AgCareers.com Agribusiness HR Review).


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Published on October 27th, 2016

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