talking compensation in an interviewChances are if you’re in the market for a new job, you’re looking to bring home a decent paycheck, with a few extra perks, right? While compensation isn’t the only reason folks job hunt, it certainly plays a part in the position someone might accept. Most folks don’t work just to kill time, and no one ever said, you guys are paying me too much. With that in mind, it is important to know the etiquette and the ever-increasing legal landscape of talking dollars during the process.

 

Before going into any interview situation, you should know your worth and have an idea of what the market will pay for the position you’re applying for. Also, have a few reasons in mind of why you are worth the number you’re requesting. If you don’t start out with a solid reasonings of what you’re worth and why, you may accept any number offered to you, leaving you dissatisfied in the end. In recent years, several states have made it illegal for employers to ask about an applicant’s salary history. If an applicant has experienced pay discrimination in the past, or was simply underpaid, they don’t want their previous salary to undercut a current job offer. Knowing the laws in your state may help you navigate this dilemma.


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Published on November 2nd, 2017

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rocking your interviewInterviewing is one of the most stressful parts of the job search process. A candidate is put under scrutiny to answer questions about their past job experiences and performance in addition to questions about their skills and abilities. There can be a lot riding on this one conversation and so how to calm the nerves and come across as the confident, capable candidate that you are? Music can motivate and inspire during the job search process, so here are some classic rock suggestions for some pre-interview listening and zeroing in on rocking your interview!

 
“I won’t back down, hey baby there ain’t no easy way out, I won’t back down” (Tom Petty, “I Won’t Back Down”). The job search process is not easy and takes a lot of work. This is a reminder that persistence is key to success.


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Published on October 26th, 2017

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interview thank youSometimes the simplest of gestures can have huge impact. That certainly can be said for a thank you and follow-up after an interview. While most would think saying thank you is standard, in today’s world it often gets overlooked. However, employers are watching and in a tight candidate search, the time writing a quick interview thank you can put you above the competition.

 

Obviously, start with a nice thank you. You can thank them for their time, their insight about the opportunity, and for considering you for the role. Be genuine and sincere in whatever you choose to thank them for.


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Published on September 14th, 2017

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how to talk about your current job in an interviewIf you’re already in a job interview situation, chances are you aren’t crazy about your current job. You’re anxiously waiting for the interviewer to ask you that inevitable question, “Why do you want to leave your current position?”
 
How can you eloquently discuss your current job, boss, and why you are leaving?
 
You know the saying “Keep your mouth shut if you don’t have anything good to say!” While it’s true, silence is not an option in a job interview. There are a few very basic reasons that can be simply explained, such as an employer going out of business, a long commute or relocating with a family member. Beyond that, it’s important to stay clear of negativity regarding your current job. If you spew hatred for your current supervisor or employer, it only makes the interviewer think you will do the same with their organization someday.


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Published on September 12th, 2017

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informational interviews
By Danielle Tucker, 2017 AgCareers.com Marketing Intern
 
Informational interviews are meetings that job seekers can utilize with employers to find out more information, ask advice, and seek answers. They also allow employers to get to know a potential candidate for a position in the company. Although, it is important to know that this is not a job interview and your goal is to gather information and network rather than finding job openings.
 
As a job seeker, it can be difficult to get an interview if the employers have several resumes to sort through. Utilizing informational interviews can work to your advantage, however, they can also help a company eliminate you from their pile of papers. To decide whether or not you should pursue an informational interview, examine the pros, cons, and guidelines.


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Published on July 13th, 2017

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EQ emotional intelligenceWe’re all familiar with IQ, or Intelligence Quotient. For years people assumed that IQ was the source of a person’s success. However, studies indicated that people with the highest IQs outperform those with average IQs just 20% of the time, while people with average IQs outperform those with high IQs 70% of the time. Emotional Intelligence 2.0 by Travis Bradberry and Jean Greaves provides an in-depth look at this topic. They explain that the physical source of Emotional Intelligence (EQ) is communication between your rational and emotional areas of the brain.

 
EQ is a person’s ability to identify and manage your own emotions and the emotions of others. EQ allows you to handle yourself and relationships in challenging circumstances at work and home. It generally includes:


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Published on June 22nd, 2017

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what are you most proud ofI’ve always thought that one of the hardest (but also one of the most common) interview questions to answer is, “What are you most proud of?” Not everyone thinks of their accomplishments as anything major, but it’s important to share them with your interviewer for them to understand what you are capable of and what fulfills your pride (as they certainly want you to be proud of your work if you end up as their employee). Your interviewer will also be looking for an answer detailing the process of how you accomplished whatever it is that you are most proud of.

 

First of all, here’s how to NOT answer the question (as I did for my first real job interview): don’t give a short answer. There should be a story involved here with a beginning and an ending. You should lead the interview from how this accomplishment materialized through the end result and then why you are proud of it.


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Published on June 8th, 2017

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before the interview checklistCongratulations on getting an interview! Now it is time to prepare yourself to be sure you are on you are on your “A” game before the interview. Here is a checklist to help prepare yourself for the big day.

 

Research the company

It is important to know the company and know your audience before the interview. If you are serious about this interview, you need to show your interviewers that you have done the work ahead of time. What is their culture? What do they actually do? You will really impress your audience if you are able to pull information about the company in your prepared answers. Show them you are ready to be a part of their team!

 

Know your resume

This may be a no-brainer, but actually study your resume before the interview! Know your skills, abilities and experience. Reference your resume. This will allow you to make connections between who you are, what you have done and how it will assist you in this new role.

 


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Published on April 19th, 2017

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what is your dream job“What is your dream job?” can be a tricky interview question if you are not prepared to answer it. Your dream job may have nothing to do with the position you are interviewing for, so it is a good idea not to mention it in that case. Instead, connecting your answer to aspects of the position that appeal to you enables the interviewer to determine if you are a good fit for the job.

 

Why Do Interviewers Ask “What is your dream job”?

 

In addition to accessing if you have the right skills to be successful in the job, the interviewer is also interested in finding out how motivated you are, and if you will be satisfied with the role. Your response should reflect your skills, interests, and values as an employee.


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Published on April 11th, 2017

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how to spot a great boss in an interview - Mark Stewart - Agriculture Future of AmericaGuest Blogger: Mark Stewart, President & CEO of Agriculture Future of America

 watch full movie Logan online

We’ve all heard advice about being prepared for an interview. We know to do our homework on the company; know the individuals we’ll be interviewing with and their roles. We think through situational questions and our responses. We’re prepared to tie our experience to the responsibilities of the role we’re interviewing for. And above all else, we come prepared with questions! But do we go past that in our preparation? How often do we think about doing our own analysis of the company; our own interview of them, and how to spot a great boss? I can tell you from personal experience, and some record of job hopping, that it comes with practice. Not to suggest you have to job hop to figure it out – that’s me learning from my mistakes. Hopefully, you can take this advice as you look towards your next, and perhaps last, interview!

 watch full movie Logan online

How do you spot a great boss and the right fit for you? I’ve tried to simplify what I’ve learned and heard from many mentors over the years it four simple categories.


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Published on March 30th, 2017

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