Asking for a Raise: Factors to ConsiderA few years ago, a young adult sought guidance on asking their employer for a raise. They were certain it was only the right thing to do as they had done well with the onboarding and initial training program. The young employee was feeling comfortable where they had been placed within the organization and had eagerly taken on responsibility. This person was advised that its very common for new employees to ask for a raise within the first 3 months of employment. If they were to move up in earrings they’d have to initiate it. Luckily, someone else advised it was a bad idea and if they wanted to move up they’d keep up the good work and not risk offending the employer. I completely agreed.

 

If someone has given you advice to ask for a raise before the time is right, please ignore them. While there is no absolute answer as to when is the right time to ask for a raise, start with this list to see if timing is in your favor.


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Published on April 13th, 2017

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5 highest-paying jobs in agricultureWith help from Cynthia Cole

 

Agriculture is such a great industry to consider joining! As consumer demand for agricultural products is growing both domestically and internationally, demand for a diversity of careers increases as well. And contrary to popular belief, many jobs in ag are very well-paid. To illustrate, below is a list of the five highest-paying  jobs in agriculture.

 

The 5 Highest-Paying Jobs in Agriculture

 

Ag C-Suite Executive – $200,000+

 

A company’s foremost senior executives hold strategic management and prominent leadership roles within a startup or proven organization. As one might expect, they are the highest-paying jobs in agriculture. C-Suite roles include such titles as Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Chief Operating Officer (COO), Chief Financial Officer (CFO), etc. To learn more about C-Suite Executive careers in agriculture, click on the following links to career profiles:

 


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Published on March 16th, 2017

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ag marketing specialist Jennifer BadgerJennifer Badger works as Agricultural Marketing Specialist for the South Carolina Department of Agriculture in Columbia. She has been in this role for nearly a year, but she has been working in agricultural marketing since August 2012. In this interview, she shares a bit about her career path as well as advice for young ag marketing professionals.

 

What made you interested in this career path?

 

I became interested in this career path in high school while taking marketing and agricultural vocational classes. I was very involved at my local Brevard, NC FFA chapter so upon graduation I left to study Agricultural Business Management at North Carolina State University. Marketing came more naturally to me than accounting or economics, which were also parts of my business degree, but that fact coupled with my involvement on the yearbook staff at the high school and collegiate levels, I just enjoy the communication and marketing side of ag business more. These subjects along with agricultural science classes are all very important to my current job, but I really enjoy the personal connections that ag marketing establishes.


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Published on January 31st, 2017

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Boost your career with an MBAGuest Blogger: Vera Marie Reed

 

In 2017, business majors and graduates are looking for ways to increase their earnings. They want to go into their field knowing that they will build a career worthy of the work that they put in. But, they need not worry. There are plenty of options out there.

 

Those that have a master’s degree in business administration – also known as an MBA – have several careers to choose from. All of these options currently pay their workers a high wage. As a result, people who are still looking at business careers can definitely boost their salary.


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Published on January 19th, 2017

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poultry science careersGuest Blogger: Christine Kilbride, ChickMaster

 

‘Tis the season…for college applications! Many high school seniors are currently navigating the grueling college admissions process: writing essays, requesting recommendation letters, deciding where to apply and choosing a major.

 

Choosing a major may seem like the least daunting task on the list – you can always change it, right? Well technically you can, but changing academic majors can lead to costly extra semesters or even the need to transfer to another school.

 

So where should you start? Statistically, the most popular majors include Nursing, Education, Business, Psychology and Communications[1]. If none of those options appeal to you – don’t fret; there’s a growing sector that you may not have considered for your future career: agriculture. And particularly, poultry science.


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Published on January 5th, 2017

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agricorps plansGuest Blogger: AgriCorps Fellow, Lyndee Lum; Agriculture teacher and FFA advisor in Colorado

 

Towards the end of my senior year as an undergrad, I remember feeling lucky that I had an answer to the, often dreaded, question, “What are your plans after graduation?” I was able to confidently respond with my intent to join AgriCorps and work in Ghana, Africa for 11 months. Granted, this was only one year of my life that I had planned ahead of me, but it was something. At that point, I wasn’t entirely sure what my role would be in the world. My farm background and love for plants and soil led me to believe that I would somehow be connected to the ag industry…but, how?

 

Six months later, I knew. In a doorless, dusty classroom, with a broken chalkboard and more students than desks, I found my passion: teaching. The students I taught were, hands-down, the most important part of my year in Ghana. I found inspiration in the small “Aha!” moments, and I knew that this was something I had to pursue when I returned home.


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Published on December 22nd, 2016

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Ag Social Media Accounts to FollowAt AgCareers.com, we really stress to our audience (and our employees) the importance of career education. While many of us are often caught up in our professional lives, it’s important to remember continued growth. A great way to continue to learn about the agricultural field as well as professional development is to follow particular social media accounts geared toward your interests as well as career preparation. The following are some social media accounts that I would recommend if you are interested in becoming a more well-rounded professional ready for anything from writing a resume, an interview, or your first performance review. Or just follow some of these accounts to get a better idea of what your industry is really like.

 

1. AgCareers.com

 

Shameless plug: follow AgCareers.com on our available social networks. Whether you’re looking for career development and preparation or agricultural knowledge, you’ll find it all with AgCareers.com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Also, if you’re interested in relocating to or already reside in Australia, we have an AgCareers.com Australia Twitter account.


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Published on December 16th, 2016

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Shelby LaRose AgronomistGuest Blogger: Former AgCareers.com Campus Ambassador at the University of Saskatchewan & current Crop Production Advisor with Crop Production Services Canada, Shelby LaRose

 

Coming from a small town in Southern Saskatchewan, agriculture was one of the clear choices I had when deciding on my future career path. I signed a full-time contract during the fall of my senior year at the University of Saskatchewan to be a Crop Production Advisor with Crop Production Services Canada (CPS), back in my hometown. Although I had a full year of school to finish, I was already mentally preparing for my full time career as a Crop Production Advisor, more commonly known as an agronomist.

 

You learn pretty quick that each day is a bit different when you are an agronomist. Shortly after harvest, farmers are already planning their crops and growing plans for the upcoming year. A good portion of the time I am working in the world of sales, selling the necessary elements that go into growing a crop. This includes seed (canola, corn, soybeans, wheat and forage seeds), chemical and fertilizer to my growers for various chemical and seed companies (including our own CPS/Agrium/Loveland Crop Inputs products). This involves sitting down with the grower and discussing everything from past yields of crop to soil testing results. The rest of the winter months are spent putting on grower meetings and attending various training sessions in order to become a better advisor for my customers.


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Published on November 12th, 2016

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veterans in agricultureHappy Veterans’ Day and Remembrance Day! On behalf of AgCareers.com, I want to say thank you to all who have served their country so that we may enjoy the freedoms and livelihoods that we have.

 

AgCareers.com is very dedicated to the employment and advancement of military veterans in agriculture. Since 2012, we have carried the Ag Warriors program forward, assisting military men and women in search of careers within the agriculture and food industries. We have partnered with leading agricultural employers including CHS, Inc., DuPont Pioneer, and Tyson Foods to promote the active recruitment and employment of veterans in agriculture.

 

AgCareers.com also recently completed a survey entitled “Veterans & Military Professionals in the Agricultural Workplace.” You can view the full results here, or a quick snapshot, but as a summary, it’s important that veterans know that agricultural employers want to hire them. Here are some key findings from the survey that veterans can take note of:


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Published on November 11th, 2016

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professional designations to know in agronomyPursuing a professional designation either on its own, or to complement your existing education and experience, is an excellent way to prove credibility in a certain field of expertise. While job hunting for research roles in soil, plant, or animal science, it’s common to see that Masters or PhD is required; agriculture has its own unique set of professional designations to help you differentiate yourself.

 

Each professional designation is typically governed by an industry institute or association. These bodies have varying requirements depending on the designation, often mixing courses and experience. They operate to a high standard of ethics and expect the same of their members. This group can also provide you with vital mentoring throughout your career.

 

Many of the designations that are unique to agriculture fall under the agronomy umbrella, let’s take a look at some:


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Published on November 8th, 2016

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