women in agriculture by krysta hardenAuthor’s Note: Krysta Harden, former Deputy Secretary of United States Agriculture and current Vice President Public Policy and Chief Sustainability Officer with DuPont, gave an interview for the 2016 AgCareers.com Ag & Food Career Guide concerning women in agriculture today. Since we were unable to publish the full interview in the article, it is given below.

 

Tell me about your agricultural journey. What has your career looked like over the years?

 

I grew up on a farm in southwest Georgia. My parents are still there so I have a direct connection to agriculture and folks trying to make a living on the land. During the 1980s when I was deciding what to study in college and what type of career I wanted, Ag was going through very difficult financial times. My parents encouraged me to do something other than agriculture. So I took another track, I attended the University of Georgia and studied journalism. I was drawn to Washington, D.C. and had interest in working on Capitol Hill. Working on the Hill gave me the opportunity to support and influence agriculture through policy even if I was not physically working on the farm. My heart is still there. I have seen the difficulties farmers face and I’ve dedicated my career to helping them.


By
Published on October 18th, 2016

 Read More

Meet Beth HalesBeth Hales, a decade-long member of AgCareers.com, serves as the Director of Talent Solutions in the United States. She works from AgCareers.com’s headquarters in Clinton, North Carolina.

 

What do you do on a day-to-day basis in your role with AgCareers.com?

 

My day-to-day activities revolve around leading our U.S. job board sales team and developing/executing on business strategy as part of the AgCareers.com leadership team.

 

What do you enjoy about working with AgCareers.com?

 

My journey with AgCareers.com has been ever-changing, and I enjoy the way our team tackles a variety of challenges in our efforts to be in tune with the industry and exceed customer expectations. I also enjoy the close working relationships that have been developed over the years. I feel that people in agribusiness, more than any other industry, prefer to collaborate and grow better together.

 

What advice would you give to job seekers using AgCareers.com for the first time?

 

Our site lets you apply to any position without setting up a profile, but my advice would be to go ahead and do that. Having a profile will save time, and provide more tools to aid your search. We all know that making a career move can be very time-consuming, almost a part-time job these days. Why not take three minutes to make your life easier?


By
Published on October 13th, 2016

 Read More

temporary positionWorking in a temporary position can lead to great things! While Ryan the Temp from The Office is obviously not a real person, he rose through the ranks to eventually become second in command at Dunder Mifflin…although he was later fired for fraud…but even after that he still remained with the company for eight years!

 

Okay, bad example. But there really are a lot of positives for taking a temporary position. Most temporary positions today last for several months whether it is a seasonal position working in the field or filling in for a parent on maternity leave (especially in Canada). They serve as a great transition period for a professional dipping their toes into the working world or just looking for something to do while they search for a more permanent position. And who’s to say that this temporary position couldn’t become a permanent position?

 

To make the most out of taking a temporary position, follow these suggested tips, and then search for hundreds of temporary positions on AgCareers.com.


By
Published on October 7th, 2016

 Read More

Free internAs an employee of AgCareers.com, I’d like to think that most internships nowadays are paid. In fact, of the 704 interns participating in our 2016 Internship Benchmark Survey, NONE of their internships were unpaid, and only 1% were paid between $5 and $8.99 per hour. But there are still a few organizations out there that do not offer concrete compensation to their interns year after year (in my book, being paid less than minimum wage is essentially an unpaid internship). They may have good reason for it: they may be a nonprofit or government organization, or they offer benefits such as housing that they feel covers an intern’s compensation for the summer/term. Or perhaps your “unpaid internship” are really just clinical/educational/job shadowing hours you need to complete for educational purposes.

 

If you are considering an unpaid internship, apprenticeship, co-op, or the like, you’ll want to examine the opportunity for everything’s it’s worth to determine if the experience will pay off for you one way or another. Check out the positive and negative points about unpaid internships below before making your decision. Also, be sure to know whether your internship is really paid or unpaid before you make your decision. And inquire deeply as to whether or not this internship experience has true educational value, because if not, it could be illegal.


By
Published on October 4th, 2016

 Read More

what it's really like to be an ag teacherIowa native Carlton Ness, a graduate of South Hamilton High School and Iowa State University, is beginning his fifth year as a high school ag teacher. Teaching for four years at Aplington-Parkersburg High School, he has returned to South Hamilton in Jewell, Iowa to teach agricultural education and industrial technology in his hometown. I sat down with Carlton to ask about what it’s really like to work as an ag teacher as a celebration for ag educators throughout North America on Teach Ag Day.

 

What made you want to become an ag teacher?

 

I had a really good relationship with my high school ag teacher, Steve Olson. He did a lot for me and kind of pointed me in the right direction. I remember when I was in high school, students had to teach a lesson in one class, and after I had taught my lesson, he asked me if I had ever considered becoming an ag teacher. At the time, I just kind of laughed it off. He actually made me go to a workshop when I was a senior for those who might want to become an ag teacher, and I really liked it. I went to Iowa State thinking that animal science was what I wanted to do, but I did take some agricultural education classes. By the end of my freshman year, I had switched my major to ag education.

 

What is a day in the life like for you?

 

It’s pretty different all throughout the year because there are so many different things going on, especially in terms of extracurricular activities like the FFA Chapter. In the fall, we’re busy with getting the FFA year started and National Convention. There are lots of CDE contests in the winter and we look forward to speaking contests in the spring with practice after school. Then there are monthly meetings for FFA. It’s hard to really pinpoint what a typical day is like, because there isn’t one. And even with teaching, I teach seven very different classes. We may be working in a lab or out in the shop or taking a test. I think that’s why I like this job so much, because there’s so much variety. I never feel like I’m coming to work. I always feel like I’m doing something that I enjoy with kids.


By
Published on September 22nd, 2016

 Read More

One of my favorite TV series is The Office (my husband and I have Netflixed the entire series at least five times), and I like to feature memes from the show on this blog a lot. An episode that came to mind when I started working on this article comes from season seven when Michael has left Dunder-Mifflin and Dwight is made acting manager. Dwight being Dwight, he orders a new gun holster, has it delivered to the office, and decides he wants to wear it around, but he insists that he can’t wear a holster without a gun in it. While showing off his holster to the staff, most of them become concerned at the sight of a gun in the office and ask him to get rid of it, and while Dwight is doing so, it goes off, blowing a hole through the floor and temporarily deafening Andy Bernard.

 

Most major work mistakes may not escalate to the extreme of shooting a gun in the office, but if you have ever been hungover in front of your boss, said something you definitely should not have, or even just made a critical error on an important document, you could have a strike against you. I know that when I’ve made a mistake, I’ve felt like I’ve had to prove myself again, and Dwight had to do so to his office teammates as well, in order to regain their trust. Here are a few tips for how to bounce back after a major work mistake.


By
Published on August 9th, 2016

 Read More

DSC_0106Betty Draughton has spent one year as administrative manager with AgCareers.com. She works out of the Clinton, North Carolina headquarters.

 

What do you do on a day-to-day basis in your role with AgCareers.com?

 

I support both the company President, Eric Spell, as well as the leadership team with a variety of administrative functions. This can be anything from managing calendars and schedules, booking appointments, organizing and booking travel arrangements, coordinating meetings and events, to maintaining personnel files and ordering office supplies, just to name a few.

 

What do you enjoy about working with AgCareers.com?

 

I really enjoy that no two days are alike when I come to work each day. It is definitely not a monotonous job and I love that. I also enjoy knowing that I work for a company who truly cares about its employees and work-life balance. That means a lot this day and time!

 

What advice would you give to job seekers using AgCareers.com for the first time?

 

I would advise job seekers to make sure they use keywords when searching and also search by location. Most people that are seeking employment have a preference as to what region they’d like to work in. Then I tell them to make sure they set up an account (and that it’s free to do so), post their resume and apply right on our website to any job they find and feel suited for.


By
Published on August 1st, 2016

 Read More

IMG_3843Eric Spell serves as president and co-founder of AgCareers.com. He has been with the organization since its beginnings in 1997. He works out of the Clinton, North Carolina office.
 
What do you do on a day-to-day basis in your role with AgCareers.com?
 
Much of my day consists of supporting my teammates – client requests, marketing-related activities, new product/service development, and monitoring key performance indicators for our business. I also spend time each week planning my travel schedule for upcoming industry events.
 
What do you enjoy about working with AgCareers.com?
 
I enjoy helping people around me develop and grow professionally. It’s very important to me that people around me enjoy what they do, feel like they are accomplishing their goals, and proud to be a part of our team! I also get great satisfaction knowing that we are helping connect people with careers every single day.
 
What advice would you give to job seekers using AgCareers.com for the first time?
 
Be patient and thorough. When applying to jobs online, realize that most employers will allow a certain amount of time for a list of candidates to accumulate before replying to any candidates. This is not in all cases, but know that it may take 2-3 weeks before you hear back from a prospective employer.


By
Published on August 1st, 2016

 Read More

1Listen up, military veterans: agricultural employers WANT YOU! In a preliminary snapshot of the “Veterans and Military Professionals in the Agricultural Workplace” survey by AgCareers.com, 85% of agricultural employers agreed that military professionals and veterans have experiences and transferable skills that make them a good fit for the agricultural industry. If you are unfamiliar with the agricultural industry or simply aren’t sure which career your military skills would best align with, here are 7 high-demand ag jobs for veterans of the military.

 

7 High-Demand Ag Jobs for Veterans of the Military

 

1. Logistics: Military veterans and professionals are calculating, quick on their toes, and organized. This is the perfect combination for a career in logistics and supply chain management. Logistics professionals hold the responsibility of oversight of factory or customer deliveries, freight quotations, onsite pickup, and overflow and direct-to-port. They also implement the supply chain goals of a company. Learn the educational requirements and employers of logistics professionals.


By
Published on July 22nd, 2016

 Read More

Lauren ShotwellLauren Shotwell, AgCareers.com’s HR Services Account Manager, started as an intern for the company in the summer 0f 2010 and it developed into a full-time career. Now in her fourth year with the company, the North Carolina native works from a home office in Richmond, Virginia and has an exciting history to share.

 

What do you do on a day-to-day basis in your role with AgCareers.com?

 

I help with finding new business and interacting with inbound requests in regards to our salary survey. I reach out to potential clients who might be posting on the job board site and try to cultivate that new business. I also help with special projects on the HR side. Currently, I’m helping with our HR Review survey. My job involves a lot of email follow-up, doing demos of the database, and answering any questions clients might have.

 

What do you enjoy most about working with AgCareers.com?

 

I really like our company culture and the family atmosphere that we have. I feel like we’re all one big family and it makes working here a lot more enjoyable when you like who you work with. Everyone is willing to help each other. I worked in the government realm before this and it wasn’t like it is here. We all have each other’s back.
 
What advice would you give to job seekers using AgCareers.com for the first time?

 

Expect to have patience. That’s really important. Don’t start applying to jobs until you read a lot of our resources like our newsletter and blog. We want you to put out your best resume and materials, and we have a lot of resources to help you with that.


By
Published on July 5th, 2016

 Read More
« Newer PostsOlder Posts »