overqualifiedWhen applying for any jobs, the number one thing to keep in mind is selling to the employer’s need. This is also the case when applying for a job when overqualified. There are many reasons why a person may be applying for jobs when they are overqualified, including:

 

– Changing careers

– After a lay-off

– After completing a contract position

– Relocation

 

In these situations, jobseekers may be fearful that they are taking a step down in their career path, earning less money, and could be bored with reduced responsibilities. While these are genuine concerns, there are some positive aspects to applying for positions when overqualified:


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Published on April 7th, 2017

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how do you define career successCareer success is a subjective term and means different things to different people. However, there are some commonalities that the majority of people agree is important when it comes to discussing “career success”. A successful career is usually one where the person feels happy to go to work every day, doing something of interest to the individual. Many people also measure career success by income, employer, prestige, etc. However when it comes to these criteria, they are not the same for everyone. So, why should someone define what career success means for them? Without defining career success, it is difficult to define career goals and without goals, it is difficult to plan and achieve.

 

If you don’t define career success, you will never know when you achieve it.

 

Here are points to consider when defining career success for you:


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Published on November 30th, 2016

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Career PlanningWhat is personal agency? This refers to the capacity of people to take initiative and make progress through personal action, essentially taking charge of one’s own career. In the past, more people stayed working for the same organization for years and even decades, leaving their career development up to their employing organization. Evidence shows now that personal agency is essential for career satisfaction and success! And this applies to seeking a new job and building networks in addition to internal processes such as motivation, learning, and decision-making within a current career.

 

As a guideline for career planning, I like to use Krumboltz’s Seven-Stage DECIDES Model of career decision-making:


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Published on October 20th, 2016

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protean career actorIn my previous blog post, I discussed the consequences of career inaction. In this post, I will discuss a career self-management concept, the protean career. What is a protean career? It focuses on achieving subjective career success through self-directed vocational behaviour. Individuals who hold protean career attitudes are intent upon using their own values (versus organizational values) to guide their career (Tim Hall, 1996).

 

A protean career must be considered as a life-long series of experiences, skills, learning, transitions and identity changes that is managed by a person instead of an organization. The ingredients of success change from “know-how” to “learn-how”, from job security to employability and from “work self” to “whole self” with psychological success as a terminal goal.


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Published on August 11th, 2016

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career inactionWhat exactly is “career inaction” and why should anyone be worried about it? Career Inaction is a term coined by Belgian careers researcher Marijke Verbruggen in 2013 to describe situations where people decide to not do something or failing to act on one’s decisions. Importantly, both meanings of inaction refer to situations where people make a decision which is followed by the absence of action or change.

 

Inaction seems to be more prevalent in the working world than action when it comes to careers. For example, there are many people who complain about their jobs on a daily basis without ever looking for employment elsewhere. Careers result from many constructs including social structure, family influence, socio-economic status and of course, deliberate action taken by the person concerned.

 

Research has shown that career inaction spurs further inaction and causes “inaction inertia.” People who have bypassed an initial career opportunity are less likely to act on further opportunities even if they appear more attractive. This may explain why people get stuck in careers they dislike or why they end up in long-term unemployment even after being presented with multiple job offers.


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Published on July 28th, 2016

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