scary work situationsOh the horror! As an employee, you’re bound to run into your share of terrifying moments. Telling your boss you’re taking another job can be as scary as seeing Michael Myers watching you from down the street. Asking for a raise can be more frightening than The Blob! Here are a few scary work situations you might experience and how to be prepared to handle them.

 

Telling Your Boss You’re Leaving: Putting in your two weeks notice can make you nervous, because it could be difficult to do without burning bridges. Your boss might even be the reason you decided to leave in the first place but are not sure how to tell them. Remaining positive and being upfront are key to creating a smooth transition with your soon-to-be former employer. Check out this post for more tips to ease the anxiety of this scary work situation.

 

Asking for a Raise: Now, hopefully, the worst thing about asking for a pay raise is that your supervisor will say “no.” But let’s be honest: if they say no, it can also leave you with a bruised ego. Prepare for the meeting (and you should prepare a formal meeting to discuss this, by the way), by asking yourself these three questions.


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Published on October 31st, 2016

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managing your online reputationDoes it really matter what you tweet, photos you are tagged in on Facebook, or comments you make online? Career-wise, yes! Employers are checking out your “digital footprint” or online presence, many before making a hiring decision.

 

Employers are judging you based on your digital footprint. Recruiters will look at your online presence and this can impact their hiring decisions. The recent Jobvite Recruiter Nation Report 2016 found that recruiters find LinkedIn the most effective when vetting candidates during the hiring process, followed by Facebook and Twitter.

 

Looking specifically at agriculture, employers report high usage of social media to support their recruitment efforts; 72% of U.S. agribusinesses said they currently use social networks in recruiting, with another 14% indicating they plan to begin using them (2016-2017 U.S. AgCareers.com Agribusiness HR Review).


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Published on October 27th, 2016

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part-time workNavigating the do’s and don’ts of resume writing can be a daunting task. Deciding which job experiences to highlight, let alone which specific achievements to mention in each role, can make your resume seem like a puzzle. Being strategic in these decisions can make the difference between being overlooked for your dream job, or getting the call back to continue the conversation. It’s common knowledge that you shouldn’t include EVERY previous job experience on your resume, especially if it isn’t recent or relevant; but that doesn’t mean that part-time work shouldn’t be included. There are several instances where your part-time work can work to your advantage, including when it is relevant, shows personal interests, and proves you have required skills.

 

Serving/Bar Tending: Often this type of job overlaps with school or other work placements – highlight your time management skills while juggling multiple responsibilities. Also carefully consider what parts of this job to highlight; till management or the responsibility of closing up paints a more favorable picture than recording tips or developing a specialty drink.


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Published on October 25th, 2016

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Career PlanningWhat is personal agency? This refers to the capacity of people to take initiative and make progress through personal action, essentially taking charge of one’s own career. In the past, more people stayed working for the same organization for years and even decades, leaving their career development up to their employing organization. Evidence shows now that personal agency is essential for career satisfaction and success! And this applies to seeking a new job and building networks in addition to internal processes such as motivation, learning, and decision-making within a current career.

 

As a guideline for career planning, I like to use Krumboltz’s Seven-Stage DECIDES Model of career decision-making:


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Published on October 20th, 2016

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women in agriculture by krysta hardenAuthor’s Note: Krysta Harden, former Deputy Secretary of United States Agriculture and current Vice President Public Policy and Chief Sustainability Officer with DuPont, gave an interview for the 2016 AgCareers.com Ag & Food Career Guide concerning women in agriculture today. Since we were unable to publish the full interview in the article, it is given below.

 

Tell me about your agricultural journey. What has your career looked like over the years?

 

I grew up on a farm in southwest Georgia. My parents are still there so I have a direct connection to agriculture and folks trying to make a living on the land. During the 1980s when I was deciding what to study in college and what type of career I wanted, Ag was going through very difficult financial times. My parents encouraged me to do something other than agriculture. So I took another track, I attended the University of Georgia and studied journalism. I was drawn to Washington, D.C. and had interest in working on Capitol Hill. Working on the Hill gave me the opportunity to support and influence agriculture through policy even if I was not physically working on the farm. My heart is still there. I have seen the difficulties farmers face and I’ve dedicated my career to helping them.


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Published on October 18th, 2016

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Meet Beth HalesBeth Hales, a decade-long member of AgCareers.com, serves as the Director of Talent Solutions in the United States. She works from AgCareers.com’s headquarters in Clinton, North Carolina.

 

What do you do on a day-to-day basis in your role with AgCareers.com?

 

My day-to-day activities revolve around leading our U.S. job board sales team and developing/executing on business strategy as part of the AgCareers.com leadership team.

 

What do you enjoy about working with AgCareers.com?

 

My journey with AgCareers.com has been ever-changing, and I enjoy the way our team tackles a variety of challenges in our efforts to be in tune with the industry and exceed customer expectations. I also enjoy the close working relationships that have been developed over the years. I feel that people in agribusiness, more than any other industry, prefer to collaborate and grow better together.

 

What advice would you give to job seekers using AgCareers.com for the first time?

 

Our site lets you apply to any position without setting up a profile, but my advice would be to go ahead and do that. Having a profile will save time, and provide more tools to aid your search. We all know that making a career move can be very time-consuming, almost a part-time job these days. Why not take three minutes to make your life easier?


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Published on October 13th, 2016

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AG JOB IN THE BIG CITYGuest Blogger: Marty Tatman, Director, Program Development – American Farm Bureau Federation®

 

Lingle, Wyoming is home to 480 people and my graduating class had 27 people. My home state has about 580,000 people and is comprised of 97,800 square miles. I now live in Washington, D.C., home to 67,000+ people all squeezed into just over 68 square miles. Needless to say, the two locations are very different!

 

I grew up on our family farm three miles outside of town where I raised cattle and hogs and worked on our family farm where we grow corn and alfalfa hay. I was active in 4-H and FFA and was fortunate to travel around the U.S. attending conferences, conventions and judging contests. Those travel experiences early in life helped me realize how much there is to see and do in the world and created a desire to take my rural experiences and one day head to “the big city.” After completing my undergraduate degree, I slowly made my way to the East Coast, making stops in Nebraska (graduate school), Florida (for a four-month job that wasn’t a fit), and Indiana (working for the National FFA Organization) before landing in our nation’s capital.


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Published on October 11th, 2016

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temporary positionWorking in a temporary position can lead to great things! While Ryan the Temp from The Office is obviously not a real person, he rose through the ranks to eventually become second in command at Dunder Mifflin…although he was later fired for fraud…but even after that he still remained with the company for eight years!

 

Okay, bad example. But there really are a lot of positives for taking a temporary position. Most temporary positions today last for several months whether it is a seasonal position working in the field or filling in for a parent on maternity leave (especially in Canada). They serve as a great transition period for a professional dipping their toes into the working world or just looking for something to do while they search for a more permanent position. And who’s to say that this temporary position couldn’t become a permanent position?

 

To make the most out of taking a temporary position, follow these suggested tips, and then search for hundreds of temporary positions on AgCareers.com.


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Published on October 7th, 2016

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Free internAs an employee of AgCareers.com, I’d like to think that most internships nowadays are paid. In fact, of the 704 interns participating in our 2016 Internship Benchmark Survey, NONE of their internships were unpaid, and only 1% were paid between $5 and $8.99 per hour. But there are still a few organizations out there that do not offer concrete compensation to their interns year after year (in my book, being paid less than minimum wage is essentially an unpaid internship). They may have good reason for it: they may be a nonprofit or government organization, or they offer benefits such as housing that they feel covers an intern’s compensation for the summer/term. Or perhaps your “unpaid internship” are really just clinical/educational/job shadowing hours you need to complete for educational purposes.

 

If you are considering an unpaid internship, apprenticeship, co-op, or the like, you’ll want to examine the opportunity for everything’s it’s worth to determine if the experience will pay off for you one way or another. Check out the positive and negative points about unpaid internships below before making your decision. Also, be sure to know whether your internship is really paid or unpaid before you make your decision. And inquire deeply as to whether or not this internship experience has true educational value, because if not, it could be illegal.


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Published on October 4th, 2016

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