Video resumes have become an emerging trend over the last few years, but as with any trend you should evaluate if it’s right for you before jumping on the bandwagon. (I sure wish I would have done that with some of my early 2000’s clothing choices!) Is a video resume something that will entice employers or turn them off?

 

The jury is still out on what employers think of receiving video resumes from candidates. A survey by Vault Inc. discovered what while most employers are receptive of video resumes less than 20% have actually viewed a video resume. Some employers are leery of being accused of discrimination if they do not proceed with the candidate, as the video will clearly showcase gender, race, age and other characteristics. If you do create a video resume, simply include the URL on the information you share with the employer and they can choose whether to view it.


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Published on December 7th, 2017

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getting a professional headshot doneIn a world where most anything can be found online, it is important to be aware of your social presence not only on a personal standpoint but a professional stand point as well. That first impression can make a huge difference in whether you will land the job interview. Consider what someone may find when they search for you on the internet. Ask yourself, what picture of me is going to pop up when an employer is searching for me? Is this picture what I really want my future employer to see and does it represent who I am on a professional level? It may be time to consider getting a professional headshot done.

 

Here are some things to consider when getting your photo taken.


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Published on November 28th, 2017

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procrastinatorIt happens to all of us at one point or another. Whether it’s a work project, laundry, or Christmas shopping, there tends to be at least one thing that continuously gets pushed back until the last possible minute. There’s a procrastinator in all of us. I am big proponent of list making- crossing off a task once completed is a feeling that I love! However, I’ll admit that there is generally at least one task on my weekly to-do list that doesn’t get crossed off and then reappears on the next weeks list, and the next weeks and sometimes even the week after that.

 

Why is this? The easy answer is that some tasks are just less appealing than others (I don’t know anyone who gets excited about folding laundry). But what about the work projects that you just can’t seem to get a start on and keep pushing off? Assuming you’re not a lazy employee and are just a procrastinator, it likely has more to do with:


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Published on November 21st, 2017

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friends with your bossWe all spend most of our time at work, so it is only natural that friendships are established in the workplace. Usually these relationships develop with co-workers, but when it happens between a boss and subordinate, things can get tricky! Being friends with your boss comes with a unique set of boundaries that should be observed.
 
The number 1 thing to remember is – He/She is your boss first, and your friend second!
 
If you keep this number 1 rule in mind, the rest of the below suggestions should be relatively easy to follow:


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Published on November 16th, 2017

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recruiters vs. headhuntersThe terms “recruiter” and “headhunter” are sometimes confusing to folks outside the human resources realm. What do they mean? How do recruiters vs. headhunters compare? When contacted by a recruiter or headhunter, how do you know if they have your best interest at heart? Are they working for the employer you are hoping will hire you? Or are they an outside recruiter who is representing you to the employer? What’s in it for them?

 

Basically, there are two types of recruiters: internal recruiters and headhunters. While both are typically referred to as recruiters, there is a big difference between them. Knowing the difference between recruiters vs. headhunters can really help as you seek your next career move.

 

Recruiters vs. Headhunters

 
If contacted by a recruiter who is on staff with an employer you are hoping will hire you, they are considered an internal, or in-house, recruiter. As part of the talent acquisition team or HR department, every interaction the internal recruiter will have with you is part of the evaluation process for the role they have in mind for you. They are working through the hiring process to assess you and move you to the next step in the evaluation process until that position has been filled. The internal recruiter likely became aware of you through an application you submitted to the company or they located your profile on a job board. Your communication with that internal recruiter is typically more formal in nature, and rightfully so, as everything you say and do really matters towards that single hiring outcome. With each communication, the internal recruiter is assessing you for fit – not only for a particular role within the company, but also for the company’s overall culture.


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Published on November 14th, 2017

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eradicate resume clichesI suppose it’s time to take my own advice from this blog to update my resume and online profiles! NO, I’m not looking for a new job, but I’ve realized my descriptors are tired, overused, and dated. Updating your personal introduction, social media profiles, resume or CV should be completed on a regular basis, even if you are happily employed. If you’re actively job searching, it can make all the difference if you delete old phrases and resume cliches and add a few powerful, action words.

 
Even though it may still fit, my “dynamic and driven professional” descriptor has evolved into a group of resume cliches. You know, those buzzwords that have become abused in the workplace? Synergy. Team effort. Strategic. Innovative. The words we are guilty of overusing in everyday life and conversations: excellent, very, good, love, great…and the list could go on and on.

 
Most of us on the road to career and self-improvement love (there’s that overused word again) lists of what NOT to do. I guess it’s easy for us to identify what we should be avoiding and make quick changes. By no means is this list exhaustive, but if you are wasting valuable space on your resume with some of these weak words or jargon, then you should consider replacing them soon:

 


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Published on November 7th, 2017

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talking compensation in an interviewChances are if you’re in the market for a new job, you’re looking to bring home a decent paycheck, with a few extra perks, right? While compensation isn’t the only reason folks job hunt, it certainly plays a part in the position someone might accept. Most folks don’t work just to kill time, and no one ever said, you guys are paying me too much. With that in mind, it is important to know the etiquette and the ever-increasing legal landscape of talking dollars during the process.

 

Before going into any interview situation, you should know your worth and have an idea of what the market will pay for the position you’re applying for. Also, have a few reasons in mind of why you are worth the number you’re requesting. If you don’t start out with a solid reasonings of what you’re worth and why, you may accept any number offered to you, leaving you dissatisfied in the end. In recent years, several states have made it illegal for employers to ask about an applicant’s salary history. If an applicant has experienced pay discrimination in the past, or was simply underpaid, they don’t want their previous salary to undercut a current job offer. Knowing the laws in your state may help you navigate this dilemma.


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Published on November 2nd, 2017

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job search lessons from AgCareers.comThere is certainly no shortage of advice when it comes to the job search process, as most everyone has an opinion about the steps both novice and seasoned job seekers should take. Knowing that the insight comes from a place of credibility is key. That’s why I’ve asked AgCareers.com staff members to share job search lessons learned from their personal  experiences as well as from working with active job seekers as part of their daily roles. Interviews with these staff members included so much great information that is pertinent to today’s job seeker!

 

What are some of the most memorable job search lessons you’ve learned from the process?

 

“Accomplishments do not necessarily mean you will get a job if they are not relevant to the specific job. Out of school, I listed a lot of my awards and accomplishments that were not relevant to the job…employers are looking for specific skills and competencies.” Carolyn Lee, Talent Solutions Manager Western Canada

 

“Even if you don’t have all the preferred qualifications listed in a job description, apply anyway! If an applicant meets the required qualifications, employers will likely still consider your application. Oftentimes the preferred qualifications are their wish list, but perhaps not realistic in the candidate pool.” Bonnie Johnson, Marketing Associate


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Published on October 31st, 2017

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rocking your interviewInterviewing is one of the most stressful parts of the job search process. A candidate is put under scrutiny to answer questions about their past job experiences and performance in addition to questions about their skills and abilities. There can be a lot riding on this one conversation and so how to calm the nerves and come across as the confident, capable candidate that you are? Music can motivate and inspire during the job search process, so here are some classic rock suggestions for some pre-interview listening and zeroing in on rocking your interview!

 
“I won’t back down, hey baby there ain’t no easy way out, I won’t back down” (Tom Petty, “I Won’t Back Down”). The job search process is not easy and takes a lot of work. This is a reminder that persistence is key to success.


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Published on October 26th, 2017

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bored at workDo you ever just die from boredom at work? I’m writing this blog right now because the other task I was working on was frankly boring me to death. So I thought I’d write a blog about being bored at work! Great solution, right? Well, in my role it works, but if you’re in a different role, it might be more tempting to spend the next two solid hours trolling Facebook, shopping for Christmas gifts, or getting sucked down a Wikipedia black hole. I probably don’t have to tell you that, although tempting, that’s probably not the best way to spend your paid company time. So how do you combat boredom in the workplace?
 

12 Ways to Keep from Being Bored at Work

 

Ask for Something to Do: This is a pretty obvious choice, but if you’re literally out of things to do, ask your manager or supervisor if there is anything they need help with or if there’s something that they can think of for you to do. You may be hesitating to do this, because you want to appear self-sufficient or don’t want to bother your boss, or even let them know that you are bored in the first place. Just know that it would probably bother them more to know that you’re playing Solitaire instead of getting something done, so simply ask nicely if you can help out with a task on their plate or if there is anything they have in mind for you to work on.


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Published on October 20th, 2017

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