Meet Chris McLoughlinChris McLoughlin recently joined AgCareers.com as an Inside Sales Representative for Western Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. He works from the Guelph, Ontario office.

 

What do you do on a day-to-day basis in your role with AgCareers.com?

 

I reach out to current and perspective customers by both phone and email to make sure that they understand the benefits and value they get when posting jobs with us and I drink a lot of coffee.

 

What do you enjoy about working with AgCareers.com?

 

The people I work with are amazing and make coming into work each day a breeze. Being a small part of helping people reach their potential in their chosen careers is a great feeling.

 

What advice would you give to job seekers using AgCareers.com for the first time?

 

Upload your resume!! It is great to use the Website to look for jobs but if your resume is on the system employers can search you out and you never know what great opportunities that can open for you.

 


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Published on September 19th, 2017

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interview thank youSometimes the simplest of gestures can have huge impact. That certainly can be said for a thank you and follow-up after an interview. While most would think saying thank you is standard, in today’s world it often gets overlooked. However, employers are watching and in a tight candidate search, the time writing a quick interview thank you can put you above the competition.

 

Obviously, start with a nice thank you. You can thank them for their time, their insight about the opportunity, and for considering you for the role. Be genuine and sincere in whatever you choose to thank them for.


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Published on September 14th, 2017

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how to talk about your current job in an interviewIf you’re already in a job interview situation, chances are you aren’t crazy about your current job. You’re anxiously waiting for the interviewer to ask you that inevitable question, “Why do you want to leave your current position?”
 
How can you eloquently discuss your current job, boss, and why you are leaving?
 
You know the saying “Keep your mouth shut if you don’t have anything good to say!” While it’s true, silence is not an option in a job interview. There are a few very basic reasons that can be simply explained, such as an employer going out of business, a long commute or relocating with a family member. Beyond that, it’s important to stay clear of negativity regarding your current job. If you spew hatred for your current supervisor or employer, it only makes the interviewer think you will do the same with their organization someday.


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Published on September 12th, 2017

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return to the farm somedayBy 2017 AgCareers.com Marketing Intern Danielle Tucker

 

As you got older while growing up on a family farm, you might have been itching to leave the farm, so you decided to pursue a degree and find a job off the farm and gain an education. Although at the time it felt right, you might feel like climbing the corporate ladder didn’t seem to quite fit what you were after. There might be a little voice in the back of your head telling you where your true passion lies. Ultimately, your goals are to return to the farm where you grew up and first fell in love with agriculture.

 

Now hold on… just because you are longing to farm doesn’t mean you can’t and it doesn’t mean getting an education was the wrong choice. Education is absolutely vital to help advance the agricultural industry due to the rapidly changing way of life.

 

So, let’s develop a plan and start thinking long term! Maybe you decided you want to return to the farm someday, whether it’s family owned or maybe it’s not. But your goal is to farm. Look at some things listed below that you’ll need to do to reach your goal.


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Published on September 8th, 2017

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continuing educationIt is always important to grow as a person not only in your personal life but also your processional career. Conferences, continuing education and other training opportunities are a great way to learn and grow in your professional career. Sometimes it can be a bit awkward or even a little stressful to ask your boss to spend the money on you to participate in different opportunities. Here a few tips on how to ask for these opportunities.
 

Research the event or training program:
 

• What exactly is it that you want to attend
• What is the goal/takeaway of the continuing education or training program
• Compare a few different programs/events
• When will this occur and how much time away from your job
• How much will it cost: Registration, Hotel/Lodging, Food, Transportation
• What type of companies attend

 


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Published on August 31st, 2017

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ag 101 things you should know if you work in agricultureAgriculture: there’s a lot to it! There’s so much information and knowledge to be had about the industry that it’s quite impossible for anyone to grasp it, and you may even think that you don’t need to know much about agriculture to work in it. Sure…but at the risk of embarrassing yourself at a networking event or when discussing something about the industry with a coworker, there are some things that should just be common knowledge. AgCareers.com intern Danielle Tucker gathered up these 20 facts that you should know about agriculture if you plan to work in the industry. And if you already know them, enlighten your friends with this crash course in Ag 101!

 

Ag 101: Things You Should Just Know if You Work in Agriculture

 

1. Most corn in the field, known as field corn (or dent corn), is meant for livestock, ethanol production, and other manufactured goods. Sweet corn is the corn that you eat but makes up less than 1% of all the corn grown in the U.S. each year. (Source)
 
2. Pigs can get sunburned just like humans. (Source)
 
3. Free range means that chickens have (and this may be limited) access to outdoor spaces. Cage-free means they are not kept in cages but are not required to have outdoor access. (Source)


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Published on August 29th, 2017

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Michelle Foulke Ag Career ServicesIf you are interested in a career as a Career Consultant with a collegiate career services office, you may think you know it all, especially if you’ve worked closely with a career services professional. Michelle Foulke, Career Consultant for College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, College of Environment + Design, Odum School of Ecology and Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources at the University of Georgia, shares her insights from working in career services for the past three years.

 

What made you want to pursue working in ag career services?

 

Throughout my time in undergraduate and graduate school, I completed internships in housing, career services and judicial services. What I found unique about career services was that you can see the progress a student makes through an appointment, while that was not always the case in my other roles. There is something to be said about a student seeking out your advice instead of being required to meet with you, student appointments are usually the highlight of my entire day.


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Published on August 24th, 2017

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jennifer klein inside sales associateJennifer Klein began working with AgCareers.com in the spring of 2017 as an Inside Sales Associate. She works from the AgCareers.com Guelph, Ontario office.

 

What do you do on a day-to-day basis in your role with AgCareers.com?
 
I contact clients’ renewals and leads, assisting clients with purchasing and posting jobs, reviewing job post activity and new job posts for approval.
 

What do you enjoy about working with AgCareers.com?
 
Everything. It is such a wonderful environment with the best team a person could ask for to spend the working day with.

 

What advice would you give to job seekers using AgCareers.com for the first time?
 
Always submit a cover letter and customize your resume to the position your applying for.


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Published on August 22nd, 2017

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why wait to applyI know the feeling: seeing the job posting that you think could be your dream career and wanting to apply immediately. Hold on! Before you frantically type up your application, upload your resume, and hit “Submit,” think about how that might appear to your employer. Typically, employers can tell who hastily applied to their open positions, and trust me, it’s a turn-off from the get-go. I’ve sat on the other end and watched applications spill in for a position just posted less than an hour ago. Even though you may be excited, it sends the message that you’re sloppy and uninformed (and maybe even entitled). Here are a few reasons to wait to apply to a job posting that will likely make you look more impressive to employers.

 

Why WAIT to Apply to a Job

 

Do Your Research.

 

Do you even know what the company does that you’re applying to? Make sure that you’ve checked out the company and the position through and through before beginning the application process. You may find that the company has an unfavorable reputation or that their values do not align with your own. If this is a long-term career move, you’ll want to wait to apply to be sure that the company you’re working for is one that you can stand behind.


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Published on August 15th, 2017

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15 THINGS AG STUDENTS KNOWBy Danielle Tucker, 2017 AgCareers.com Marketing Intern

 

You are a hardworking and special person who has made the decision to pursue a career path in agriculture to help feed the world and provide for the future generations to come: an ag student! However, this does come with certain side effects that you might have noticed along the way.
 
Here are 15 things ag students likely know to be true:

 

1. You most likely leave a trail of dirt behind everywhere you go.
 
You’re sitting in class and look down at a pile of dirt you just left from your boots, then casually look back up hoping no one pays attention to the floor and the mess you just left. Let’s face it, you leave a crumb trail of dirt and manure wherever you go.
 
2. You will often go to class hungover from foal/lamb/calf watch, not the bars.
 
While your friends are out late at the bars, parties, and other social gatherings, you are spending your time in a barn on foal/lamb/calve/etc. watch because of your degree requirements. You might slightly resemble a zombie the next day you walk into class.


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Published on August 10th, 2017

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